build interior wall in garage 2

build interior wall in garage 2
impression build interior wall in garage 2
graphic build interior wall in garage 2

Step 2: Design!Show All Items This step is where it starts to get exciting. Let your imagination run wild.I went through a lot of different ideas. Although not necessary at all if you have access to 3d design software it can really help visualize your designs. It also comes in handy later when calculating lumber lengths ( it does the trigonometry for you). Make sketches and think about many different designs. Then choose the best things about each design and try to combine them to make the best design possible. I took measurements of my garage and noted that i had a back corner 12' x 8' x 8' to work with. Make sure you keep the size of your space in mind when designing. It would be horrible to design a great wall only to realize it doesn't fit your space.I went through many revisions of my design. Also be aware of the materials you will be using to construct your wall. If like me you're using 3/4" plywood you want to avoid curves as much as possible and complicated angles make construction extremely difficult. After considering this I decided to forgo having a bulge and the variable angle part of the wall. Just remember keep it as simple as possible while still meeting your requirements. Every outside feature of the wall has be supported somehow by an inner frame. So trying to keep it to large square faces while still meeting all your design requirements is the easiest way to go. Eventually I settled on the basic design below. The next step was to figure out the structure of the frame and how the wall was going to be attached to the wall. When designing the frame and developing final dimensions be aware of your building materials. I was using 4 x 8 foot pieces of plywood so i designed my wall to be 12 feet wide (3 sheets of plywood) and also spaced the studs accordingly (4 studs per sheet of plywood, touching pieces of plywood share a common stud) Doing this helps prevent having to waste wood. Can you imagine having to buy an extra sheet of plywood (almost $30 a sheet!) only to cut a small piece out of it because you made the wall a foot too wide. Thinking ahead can save a lot of time and headaches.After a while I got to the framework design shown in the last photo. At this point I hadn't designed the door to get inside the wall but I knew that it would be on the vertical wall just above the 90 degree overhang. Having this model of the joists allowed me to get a good estimate of how much wood i would need. This can all be done on paper, I just didn't feel like doing the math.As you can see in my design basically all the terminating ends of the boards are screwed to a 2 x4 at the very top. This is then bolted through the ceiling to the joists. I wasn't satisfied with this and I'm a big fan of over engineering so I cut the drywall off the ceiling and added braces directly from the studs to the ceiling joists.The way the climbing holds are attached to the outer plywood "skin" is there are fasteners called 't-nuts' attached to the opposite side of the plywood. Essentially bolt attached to the opposite side of the plywood as the hold. They bite into the wood so that you can bolt the holds to the wall without having someone on the other side holding the bolt with a pair of pliers. They have a 7/16" outside diameter and I arranged them on my plywood in a 8" x 8" grid which gave me a total of 72 t-nuts per sheet of plywood. They are prodigiously expensive if you buy them at a brick and mortar store (think 35 cents a piece) but if gotten off-line they are relatively inexpensive. Mine were 9 cents a piece. I ended up getting somewhere around 500 or so and i had quite a few extra. Mine took over a week to get delivered so if your committed to making a wall now is a good time to order them.


This step is where it starts to get exciting. Let your imagination run wild.I went through a lot of different ideas. Although not necessary at all if you have access to 3d design software it can really help visualize your designs. It also comes in handy later when calculating lumber lengths ( it does the trigonometry for you). Make sketches and think about many different designs. Then choose the best things about each design and try to combine them to make the best design possible. I took measurements of my garage and noted that i had a back corner 12' x 8' x 8' to work with. Make sure you keep the size of your space in mind when designing. It would be horrible to design a great wall only to realize it doesn't fit your space.I went through many revisions of my design. Also be aware of the materials you will be using to construct your wall. If like me you're using 3/4" plywood you want to avoid curves as much as possible and complicated angles make construction extremely difficult. After considering this I decided to forgo having a bulge and the variable angle part of the wall. Just remember keep it as simple as possible while still meeting your requirements. Every outside feature of the wall has be supported somehow by an inner frame. So trying to keep it to large square faces while still meeting all your design requirements is the easiest way to go. Eventually I settled on the basic design below. The next step was to figure out the structure of the frame and how the wall was going to be attached to the wall. When designing the frame and developing final dimensions be aware of your building materials. I was using 4 x 8 foot pieces of plywood so i designed my wall to be 12 feet wide (3 sheets of plywood) and also spaced the studs accordingly (4 studs per sheet of plywood, touching pieces of plywood share a common stud) Doing this helps prevent having to waste wood. Can you imagine having to buy an extra sheet of plywood (almost $30 a sheet!) only to cut a small piece out of it because you made the wall a foot too wide. Thinking ahead can save a lot of time and headaches.After a while I got to the framework design shown in the last photo. At this point I hadn't designed the door to get inside the wall but I knew that it would be on the vertical wall just above the 90 degree overhang. Having this model of the joists allowed me to get a good estimate of how much wood i would need. This can all be done on paper, I just didn't feel like doing the math.As you can see in my design basically all the terminating ends of the boards are screwed to a 2 x4 at the very top. This is then bolted through the ceiling to the joists. I wasn't satisfied with this and I'm a big fan of over engineering so I cut the drywall off the ceiling and added braces directly from the studs to the ceiling joists.The way the climbing holds are attached to the outer plywood "skin" is there are fasteners called 't-nuts' attached to the opposite side of the plywood. Essentially bolt attached to the opposite side of the plywood as the hold. They bite into the wood so that you can bolt the holds to the wall without having someone on the other side holding the bolt with a pair of pliers. They have a 7/16" outside diameter and I arranged them on my plywood in a 8" x 8" grid which gave me a total of 72 t-nuts per sheet of plywood. They are prodigiously expensive if you buy them at a brick and mortar store (think 35 cents a piece) but if gotten off-line they are relatively inexpensive. Mine were 9 cents a piece. I ended up getting somewhere around 500 or so and i had quite a few extra. Mine took over a week to get delivered so if your committed to making a wall now is a good time to order them.


The wall is built in the same progression, with the king/jack assemblies and full-length studs done first and then the opening details added afterward. The wall is squared, sheathed, and raised as before, but this time there isn’t a place to attach the metal braces to. Instead, we use a 2-by to brace the wall. The two-car garage was wider than the longest framing stock we had, so we sistered two boards together to span across the garage diagonally for the brace. With a calm wind, one brace was sufficient to hold the wall steady until other garage walls were built, which then effectively braced the ends of the first garage wall.

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